18/01/17 What is the difference between Jury, Juror, and Jurist?

difference between Jury Juror Jurist

Jury
A group of people selected to apply the law, as stated by the judge, to the facts of a case and render a decision, called the verdict. Traditionally, an American jury was made up of 12 people who had to arrive at a unanimous decision. But today, in many states, juries in civil cases may be composed of as few as six members, and nonunanimous verdicts may be permitted. (Almost every state still requires 12-person, unanimous verdicts for criminal trials.) The philosophy behind the jury system is that — especially in a criminal case — an accused’s guilt or innocence should be judged by a group of people from the same community (“a jury of peers”), acting impartially and without bias. Recently, some courts have been experimenting with increasing the traditionally rather passive role of the jury by encouraging jurors to take notes and ask questions.

Juror
A person who serves on a jury. Lists of potential jurors are obtained from sources such as voter registration rolls, telephone directories, and department of motor vehicles’ lists. Individuals who are selected to serve on a jury receive from the court a very small fee for their time and sometimes the cost of traveling from home to court.

Jurist
1) A judge. 2) Someone who studies the law.

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